Stage 1: Trade Brings the West to Asia, and Asia to Western Audiences

Stage 2: Early Private Museums Bring Asia to the West

1. Barnum's Chinese Museum (1850). Ten Thousand Things on China and the Chinese:  Being a Picture of the Genius, Government, History, Literature, Agriculture, Arts, Trade, Manners, Customs, and Social Life fo the People of the Celestial Empire, as Illustrated by the Chinese Collection. New York: J. S. Redfield.

 

2. Conn, Steven 2000. “Where is the East? Asian objects in American museums, from Nathan Dunn to Charles Freer,” Winterthur Portfolio 35 (2/3), pp. 157-173.

 

3. Dunn, Nathan (1839). “Ten Thousand Things Chinese”: A Descriptive Catalogue of the Chinese Collection in Philadelphia. Philadelphia.

 

4. Haddad, John (1998). “The romantic collector in China: Nathan Dunn's Ten Thousand Chinese Things,” Journal of American Culture, Spring 1998, Vol. 21 (1), pp. 7-26.

 

5. Langdon, William B. (1842). Ten Thousand Things Relating to China and the Chinese; an Epitome of the Genius, Government, History, Literature, Agriculture, Arts, Trade, Manners, Customs, and Social Life of the People of the Celestial Empire. London.

 

6. Pagani, Catherine (1998). “Chinese material culture and British perceptions of China in the mid-nineteenth century.” In Tim Barringer and Tom Flynn (eds.), Colonialism and the Object: Empire, Material Culture and the Museum, pp. 28-40. London and NY: Routledge.

 

7. Saxbee, Helen (1990). An Orient Exhibited--The Exhibition of the Chinese Collection in England in the 1840s.

PhD dissertation, Royal College of Art, London.

 

8. Zboray, Ronald J. and Mary Saracino Zboray (2004). “Between ‘Crockery-dom’ and Barnum: Boston's Chinese Museum, 1845-47,” American Quarterly 56 (2), pp 271-307. 

 

Stage 3: Asia on Display at the World's Fairs

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